Grammar Lady lesson of the day: Than vs Then, apostrophes and plurals

by Jennifer Goodman
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The Grammar Lady is here with her lesson of the day, three of them in fact, to help you get your wording straight. Today we cover THAN vs THEN and when to use each, when to use apostrophes in words like its, and whether or not “suppose” is a word:

Than vs Then

THEN refers to time, or a sequence of events. For example, “I went to work, THEN I went to the store.” THAN is a comparison. “I would rather eat a brownie THAN a cookie.” If you say “I would rather eat a brownie THEN a cookie,” your dentist probably doesn’t like you.

Apostrophes and plurals

Apostrophes NEVER go in plus words, except possessive plurals. They only show possession of something or are used in contractions… when in doubt, LEAVE IT OUT! I’d much rather see someone leave out an apostrophe where it should be than (Look, there’s that THAN word again!) put one where it doesn’t belong.

Use “supposed” like you’re supposed to

When you say “I was supposed to do something” there is a “d” on the end of suppose. It is NOT “I was suppose to do something.” Same goes for used. “I used to chew my toenails, but now I don’t.” Thanks for learning! Stay tuned for upcoming lessons, or visit The Grammar Lady for more frequent updates.

grammar lady1 Grammar Lady lesson of the day: Than vs Then, apostrophes and plurals

Jennifer Goodman

Jennifer Goodman is the Grammar Lady.
grammar lady1 Grammar Lady lesson of the day: Than vs Then, apostrophes and plurals

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